As you've probably already noticed, our web service is modeled on an ancient Greek culture theme - using names from heroes and myth to identify features and locations. Our name and logo are similarly based. Where the Word Elysium Comes From Elysium, equates to "peaceful". In Greek mythology, Elysium refers to the abode of the blessed, paradise. Situated at the end of the world, it is here, that those chosen by the gods/goddesses are sent to. In Greek mythology, all mortal persons were consigned to the underworld (Hades) after their life on Earth was finished. Heaven was reserved for the gods/goddesses and a very few mortals who had proven themselves worthy. The most notable of the latter having been Hercules. Additionally, those mortals admitted to Heaven were generally semi divine at birth, having had a deity as one of their parents. The underworld of Greek mythology does not equate to the modern idea of Hell. Mankind had to have hope of a pleasant place to go after his life was ended; otherwise, the moral structure of Greek civilization would decay and the populace abandon worship of the divinities. The underworld consisted of three parts where a mortal soul might go to spend the rest of eternity. As a soul descended to Hades, his first stop would be the region called Erebus. This was the limbo region prior to crossing the waters where the River Acheron (The River of Woe) and the River Cocytus (The River of Lamentation) joined. Charon would then ferry the dead across the water to the gates of the underworld proper. However, souls which were not properly buried and/or who had not had a coin placed on their lips for the passage fare were refused transport by the boatman. These souls were left to wail and remain without a resting place in the afterlife. There are three other rivers, for a total of five, surrounded Hades and separated it from the upper world of the living: the Phlegethon (River of Fire), the Styx (River of Unbreakable Oath), and the Lethe (River of Forgetfulness). On the far shore was the three-headed watchdog, Cerberus. He would admit the dead into Hades but would allow none to return to the surface world. After passing by Cerberus, each soul was brought before three judges: Rhadamanthus, Minos and Aeacus. The former life of the newly dead would be examined and their place in the underworld determined by their worldly deeds. For those people who were judged sinners there was Tartarus. Tartarus was as far below the surface of the Earth as the Earth was below Heaven. It was here that eternal torture or torment was meted out to those unfortunate enough to earn the wrath of the gods. Examples of such torments can be found in the stories of Tantalus and Sisyphus. Tantalus, was placed within a pool, hungry and thirsty; and, each time he bent for a drink the pool would drain. As he reached for fruit on the branch above him, the limb would move out of reach. Sisyphus was convicted of having tricked and toyed with the gods during his mortal existence. He was condemned to eternally roll a large stone to the top of a hill, only to have it roll back down again. The third area would roughly equate to our concept of heaven and was reserved for those mortals who had proven themselves worthy by great deeds, unselfish piety or aiding the gods. This was called the Elysium Fields (sometimes seen as Elysian Fields). Here the souls of the dead would be able to hunt, feast and converse with others of their status to their heart's desire. Naturally, this was the level desired by those who lived during that time. We are named Elysium Gates because we envision ourselves as a portal on the net to a cyberland of harmony where worthy members are surrounded by outstanding web sites and caring people.
We weave caring and purpose into the net.
©Elysium Gates 2001-2021 Designed by Crystal Cloud Graphics
Always click on my picture (I am Medira the Elysium Gates mascot) to move through each page of the tour in order (like a “next button”).
As you've probably already noticed, our web service is modeled on an ancient Greek culture theme - using names from heroes and myth to identify features and locations. Our name and logo are similarly based. Where the Word Elysium Comes From Elysium, equates to "peaceful". In Greek mythology, Elysium refers to the abode of the blessed, paradise. Situated at the end of the world, it is here, that those chosen by the gods/goddesses are sent to. In Greek mythology, all mortal persons were consigned to the underworld (Hades) after their life on Earth was finished. Heaven was reserved for the gods/goddesses and a very few mortals who had proven themselves worthy. The most notable of the latter having been Hercules. Additionally, those mortals admitted to Heaven were generally semi divine at birth, having had a deity as one of their parents. The underworld of Greek mythology does not equate to the modern idea of Hell. Mankind had to have hope of a pleasant place to go after his life was ended; otherwise, the moral structure of Greek civilization would decay and the populace abandon worship of the divinities. The underworld consisted of three parts where a mortal soul might go to spend the rest of eternity. As a soul descended to Hades, his first stop would be the region called Erebus. This was the limbo region prior to crossing the waters where the River Acheron (The River of Woe) and the River Cocytus (The River of Lamentation) joined. Charon would then ferry the dead across the water to the gates of the underworld proper. However, souls which were not properly buried and/or who had not had a coin placed on their lips for the passage fare were refused transport by the boatman. These souls were left to wail and remain without a resting place in the afterlife. There are three other rivers, for a total of five, surrounded Hades and separated it from the upper world of the living: the Phlegethon (River of Fire), the Styx (River of Unbreakable Oath), and the Lethe (River of Forgetfulness). On the far shore was the three-headed watchdog, Cerberus. He would admit the dead into Hades but would allow none to return to the surface world. After passing by Cerberus, each soul was brought before three judges: Rhadamanthus, Minos and Aeacus. The former life of the newly dead would be examined and their place in the underworld determined by their worldly deeds. For those people who were judged sinners there was Tartarus. Tartarus was as far below the surface of the Earth as the Earth was below Heaven. It was here that eternal torture or torment was meted out to those unfortunate enough to earn the wrath of the gods. Examples of such torments can be found in the stories of Tantalus and Sisyphus. Tantalus, was placed within a pool, hungry and thirsty; and, each time he bent for a drink the pool would drain. As he reached for fruit on the branch above him, the limb would move out of reach. Sisyphus was convicted of having tricked and toyed with the gods during his mortal existence. He was condemned to eternally roll a large stone to the top of a hill, only to have it roll back down again. The third area would roughly equate to our concept of heaven and was reserved for those mortals who had proven themselves worthy by great deeds, unselfish piety or aiding the gods. This was called the Elysium Fields (sometimes seen as Elysian Fields). Here the souls of the dead would be able to hunt, feast and converse with others of their status to their heart's desire. Naturally, this was the level desired by those who lived during that time. We are named Elysium Gates because we envision ourselves as a portal on the net to a cyberland of harmony where worthy members are surrounded by outstanding web sites and caring people.
We weave caring and purpose into the net.
©Elysium Gates 2001-2021 Designed by Crystal Cloud Graphics
Always click on my picture (I am Medira the Elysium Gates mascot) to move through each page of the tour in order (like a “next button”).